Top 57 Slang For Trick – Meaning & Usage - FluentSlang (2024)

When it comes to pulling off a clever move or outsmarting someone, having the right slang for “trick” can make all the difference. Whether you’re a seasoned pro or just looking to up your game, we’ve got you covered with a curated list of the trendiest and most effective terms to add to your vocabulary. Get ready to level up your lingo and impress your friends with these must-know tricks of the trade!

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1. Con

A con refers to a deceptive or fraudulent act, typically involving gaining the trust or confidence of someone in order to manipulate or deceive them. It is often used in the context of scams or schemes.

  • For example, “He ran a con on unsuspecting investors, promising high returns on their investments.”
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might say, “Beware of email cons that ask for your personal information.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’ve seen every con in the book, and I can spot them a mile away.”

2. Scam

A scam refers to a fraudulent or dishonest scheme or operation, typically designed to trick or deceive someone in order to gain money or valuables. It often involves false promises or misleading information.

  • For instance, “She fell victim to an online scam, losing thousands of dollars.”
  • In a conversation about financial scams, someone might warn, “Don’t fall for pyramid schemes or get-rich-quick scams.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities busted a large-scale scam operation, arresting several individuals involved.”

3. Hustle

Hustle can have multiple meanings, but in the context of trickery or deception, it refers to conning or working hard to achieve a particular goal. It can also mean engaging in illegal or dishonest activities for personal gain.

  • For example, “He hustled his way into a high-paying job, despite lacking the necessary qualifications.”
  • In a discussion about street scams, someone might say, “Watch out for the shell game hustlers on the corner.”
  • A character in a TV show might say, “I’ve been hustling my whole life, finding ways to get what I want.”

4. Grift

Grift is a slang term for swindle or a fraudulent scheme, often involving tricking someone out of money or valuables through deception or manipulation.

  • For instance, “He fell for the grift and lost his life savings.”
  • In a conversation about confidence tricks, someone might say, “The art of the grift requires charm and cunning.”
  • A crime documentary might feature stories of notorious grifters and their elaborate schemes.

5. Bamboozle

Bamboozle means to deceive or trick someone, often by confusing or misleading them. It implies a sense of being fooled or duped.

  • For example, “He tried to bamboozle his way out of the situation, but we saw through his lies.”
  • In a discussion about magic tricks, someone might say, “The magician bamboozled the audience with his incredible illusions.”
  • A character in a book might exclaim, “I can’t believe I let myself be bamboozled by his smooth talking.”

6. Dupe

To dupe someone means to deceive or trick them into believing something that is not true. It is often used when someone is fooled or misled by someone else’s actions or words.

  • For example, “He thought he was buying a genuine Rolex, but he was duped into buying a counterfeit.”
  • In a prank, one person might say, “Let’s dupe our friend into thinking there’s a ghost in the house.”
  • A scammer might try to dupe someone by saying, “You’ve won a free vacation! Just send us your credit card information to claim it.”

7. Cheat

To cheat means to act dishonestly or unfairly in order to gain an advantage or deceive someone. It is commonly used in the context of cheating in a game, relationship, or academic setting.

  • For instance, “He cheated on the test by looking at his neighbor’s paper.”
  • In a relationship, one person might say, “I can’t believe you cheated on me with my best friend!”
  • A player in a sports game might be accused of cheating if they break the rules to gain an unfair advantage.

8. Hoax

A hoax is a humorous or malicious deception intended to trick someone into believing something false. It is often used to describe a prank or a false story that is spread to fool or mislead people.

  • For example, “The news about the alien invasion turned out to be a hoax.”
  • In a practical joke, someone might say, “Let’s pull a hoax on our friend by pretending we’re all zombies.”
  • A viral internet hoax might involve spreading false information, such as “Eating a spoonful of cinnamon can cure COVID-19.”

9. Gimmick

A gimmick is a trick or device used to attract attention or increase the appeal of something. It is often used to describe a clever or unique feature that sets something apart from others.

  • For instance, “The new smartphone’s gimmick is a pop-up selfie camera.”
  • In advertising, a company might use a gimmick to promote their product, such as “Buy one, get one free!”
  • A magician might say, “Watch closely as I perform my latest gimmick, the disappearing coin trick.”

10. Ploy

A ploy is a cunning plan or action intended to deceive or outwit someone. It is often used to describe a clever or strategic move made to gain an advantage or trick someone.

  • For example, “She used the ploy of pretending to be lost in order to get help from a stranger.”
  • In a game of chess, a player might employ a ploy to trap their opponent’s king.
  • A spy might use a ploy to gain access to classified information, such as disguising themselves as a janitor to infiltrate a building.

11. Conjure

To “conjure” means to deceive or trick someone, often by using skillful manipulation or sleight of hand. It can also refer to creating something out of nothing, as if by magic.

  • For example, a magician might say, “Watch closely as I conjure a rabbit out of thin air.”
  • In a con artist movie, a character might say, “He can conjure up a convincing disguise in seconds.”
  • A person discussing a clever deception might say, “She managed to conjure a plausible alibi for her whereabouts.”

12. Finesse

To “finesse” something means to handle or manipulate it skillfully, often in a way that deceives or tricks others. It can also refer to using subtle tactics or strategies to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For instance, a card player might say, “I finesse my opponents by bluffing when I have a weak hand.”
  • In a business negotiation, someone might say, “He finesse his way into getting a better deal.”
  • A person discussing a clever solution might say, “She finesse the problem by finding a loophole in the rules.”

13. Sharp practice

“Sharp practice” refers to unfair or deceitful behavior, often intended to gain an advantage or trick someone. It can also refer to using cunning or clever tactics to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, a person might say, “He used sharp practice to win the game.”
  • In a discussion about business ethics, someone might say, “Sharp practice can damage a company’s reputation.”
  • A person discussing a dishonest act might say, “She resorted to sharp practice to get ahead in her career.”

14. Fast one

To pull a “fast one” means to deceive or trick someone with a deceptive or tricky action. It can also refer to doing something quickly or unexpectedly.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He pulled a fast one by switching the cards when no one was looking.”
  • In a prank video, someone might say, “Watch as we pull a fast one on our unsuspecting friends.”
  • A person discussing a clever maneuver might say, “She pulled a fast one by dodging the obstacle at the last second.”

15. Sting

To “sting” someone means to scam or swindle them, often by using deception or trickery. It can also refer to the act of tricking someone into revealing information or falling for a trap.

  • For example, a person might say, “He fell for the sting operation and ended up in jail.”
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might say, “Be careful not to fall for a phishing sting.”
  • A person discussing a clever scheme might say, “She orchestrated a sting to catch the thief red-handed.”

16. Flimflammer

A flimflammer is a person who tricks or deceives others, often for financial gain. This term is commonly used to describe someone who engages in dishonest or fraudulent activities.

  • For example, “Watch out for that flimflammer, he’s always trying to scam people out of their money.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I fell for that flimflammer’s scheme.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might mention, “The flimflammer used a clever trick to convince people to invest in his fake company.”

17. Bamboozler

A bamboozler is someone who deceives or tricks others in a playful or mischievous way. It is often used to describe someone who uses cunning or clever tactics to fool others.

  • For instance, “He’s a skilled bamboozler, always coming up with new pranks.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t let that bamboozler fool you, he’s just pretending.”
  • In a discussion about practical jokes, someone might mention, “The bamboozler pulled off an elaborate prank that had everyone laughing.”

18. Charlatan

A charlatan is a person who pretends to have knowledge or skills they do not possess, often with the intention of deceiving others. This term is commonly used to describe someone who claims to be an expert or professional but is actually a fraud.

  • For example, “That charlatan claimed to be a doctor, but he had no medical training.”
  • A person might say, “Beware of charlatans who promise quick fixes or miracle cures.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might mention, “The charlatan convinced people to buy his fake products with false claims.”

19. Chicanery

Chicanery refers to the use of deception or trickery to achieve a desired outcome. It is often used to describe dishonest or manipulative behavior, especially in a political or legal context.

  • For instance, “The politician’s chicanery was exposed during the corruption investigation.”
  • A person might say, “I can see through your chicanery, you’re not fooling anyone.”
  • In a discussion about unethical business practices, someone might mention, “The company engaged in chicanery to gain a competitive advantage.”

20. Pull a fast one

To pull a fast one means to deceive or trick someone in a clever or unexpected way. It is often used to describe someone who successfully fools or outwits another person.

  • For example, “He pulled a fast one on his friends by pretending to be someone else.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t let him pull a fast one on you, he’s always playing tricks.”
  • In a discussion about pranks, someone might mention, “She pulled a fast one on her coworker by hiding his stapler.”

21. Grifter

A grifter is a person who engages in fraudulent schemes or cons in order to deceive others and obtain money or goods. The term is often used to describe someone who is skilled at manipulating and tricking others for personal gain.

  • For example, “The grifter convinced unsuspecting victims to invest in a fake business.”
  • In a discussion about famous scams, someone might mention, “Frank Abagnale, the real-life inspiration behind the movie ‘Catch Me If You Can,’ was a notorious grifter.”
  • A cautionary post might warn, “Beware of online grifters who promise quick and easy money.”

22. Hustler

A hustler is a person who uses their street smarts and cunning to deceive and trick others, often for personal gain. The term is often associated with individuals who engage in illegal activities or shady dealings.

  • For instance, “The hustler convinced people to buy counterfeit products by using clever sales tactics.”
  • In a discussion about gambling, someone might say, “He’s a skilled poker hustler who can read his opponents like a book.”
  • A cautionary post might advise, “Be wary of street hustlers offering too-good-to-be-true deals.”

23. Scammer

A scammer is a person who engages in fraudulent activities or schemes to deceive and trick others, often for financial gain. Scammers often use various tactics, such as phishing, identity theft, or fake investment opportunities, to exploit their victims.

  • For example, “The scammer pretended to be a bank representative and tricked people into revealing their personal information.”
  • In a discussion about online security, someone might share, “I fell victim to an email scammer who claimed I won a lottery I never entered.”
  • A warning post might say, “Don’t fall for the scammer’s promise of easy money. Always verify the legitimacy of offers.”

24. Deceiver

A deceiver is a person who intentionally misleads or tricks others by presenting false information or hiding their true intentions. This term often implies a level of skill and cunning in manipulating others.

  • For instance, “The deceiver convinced his friends he had a rare collectible, only to reveal it was a cleverly crafted replica.”
  • In a discussion about psychological manipulation, someone might say, “A skilled deceiver can make you question your own reality.”
  • A cautionary post might advise, “Be wary of smooth-talking deceivers who try to exploit your trust.”

25. Imposter

An imposter is a person who pretends to be someone else or assumes a false identity in order to deceive others. Imposters often use their deception to gain trust, access personal information, or manipulate others for personal gain.

  • For example, “The imposter posed as a government official and tricked people into providing their social security numbers.”
  • In a discussion about online safety, someone might share, “I encountered an imposter on social media who was using a celebrity’s name and photos.”
  • A cautionary post might warn, “Always be cautious of imposters who try to exploit your vulnerability or trust.”

26. Fraud

Fraud refers to an intentional act of deceit or deception, usually for personal gain or to trick someone into giving up their money or personal information.

  • For example, “He was arrested for credit card fraud.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Watch out for online fraudsters trying to steal your identity.”
  • In a discussion about financial crimes, one might say, “Fraudsters use various tactics to deceive their victims and make off with their money.”

27. Trickster

A trickster is someone who deceives or manipulates others for their own amusem*nt or gain. The term is often used to describe someone who plays practical jokes or engages in cunning and deceitful behavior.

  • For instance, “He’s known as the office trickster because he’s always pulling pranks on his coworkers.”
  • In a conversation about folklore, one might mention, “The trickster archetype appears in many mythologies, often as a mischievous and cunning character.”
  • A person might say, “Beware of the trickster salesman who promises you the world but delivers nothing.”

28. Sharpie

Sharpie is a slang term used to refer to a con artist or swindler who tricks others out of their money or possessions through deception or manipulation.

  • For example, “He fell victim to a sharpie who convinced him to invest in a fraudulent scheme.”
  • In a discussion about scams, one might say, “Sharpies often target vulnerable individuals with promises of quick and easy money.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Be careful not to fall for the tricks of a sharpie trying to sell you a counterfeit product.”

29. Shyster

Shyster is a derogatory term used to describe a dishonest lawyer or swindler who uses cunning and deceitful tactics to exploit others for personal gain.

  • For instance, “The defense attorney was accused of being a shyster who manipulated the legal system.”
  • In a conversation about legal ethics, one might mention, “Shysters give the legal profession a bad name by prioritizing their own interests over their clients’.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t trust that shyster lawyer; he’s just out to take your money without providing proper legal representation.”

30. Gypster

Gypster is a slang term used to refer to a trickster or scammer who deceives or tricks others for personal gain.

  • For example, “He was conned by a gypster who promised him a luxurious vacation but took his money and disappeared.”
  • In a discussion about travel scams, one might say, “Beware of gypsters offering unbelievable deals on vacation packages.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Don’t be fooled by the gypster who claims to have a secret method for getting rich quick.”

31. Con man

A con man is someone who deceives or tricks others in order to obtain money, goods, or other valuables through fraudulent means. The term is often used to describe someone who is skilled in the art of persuasion and manipulation.

  • For example, “He posed as a financial advisor but turned out to be a con man.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Beware of con men who promise quick and easy money.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’ve seen my fair share of con men in this city.”

32. Rip-off

A rip-off refers to an act of cheating or deceiving someone, usually by overcharging them or providing inferior quality goods or services in exchange for money. It is often used to describe situations where someone feels they have been taken advantage of or swindled.

  • For instance, “That store charges twice the price for the same product. It’s a total rip-off.”
  • In a discussion about online shopping, someone might say, “I got scammed by a website that turned out to be a rip-off.”
  • A customer might complain, “This restaurant is such a rip-off. The portions are tiny and the prices are outrageous.”

33. Con job

A con job refers to a fraudulent scheme or trick designed to deceive and manipulate someone in order to gain their trust or obtain something from them. It is often used to describe elaborate scams or cons that involve careful planning and execution.

  • For example, “He fell victim to a con job where someone convinced him to invest in a fake company.”
  • In a discussion about fraud, someone might say, “The con job involved convincing people to give their personal information over the phone.”
  • A character in a book might say, “The con artist pulled off an impressive con job, fooling even the most skeptical individuals.”

34. Shell game

A shell game is a dishonest gambling game that involves hiding a small object, such as a pea or ball, under one of three or more cups or shells, then shuffling them around and challenging players to guess which cup or shell the object is under. It is often used as a metaphor for trickery or deception.

  • For instance, “The street performer played a shell game with the audience, but no one could ever win.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Beware of shell games on the streets, they are designed to trick you.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “He thought he had it figured out, but it was just another shell game.”

35. Flim-flam

Flim-flam is a term used to describe a deceptive or fraudulent act, often involving the tricking or cheating of someone out of money or valuables. It is often used to describe schemes or scams that rely on clever tactics or manipulation.

  • For example, “He fell for the flim-flam and lost all his savings.”
  • In a discussion about fraud, someone might say, “The flim-flam artist used charm and persuasion to convince people to give him their money.”
  • A character in a play might say, “Don’t be fooled by his flim-flam, he’s just trying to distract you from the truth.”

36. Jive

To jive means to deceive or lie to someone. It is often used in a playful or joking manner.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Don’t jive me, I know you ate the last slice of pizza.”
  • In a comedy movie, a character might say, “Don’t listen to him, he’s just jiving you.”
  • Someone might comment on a funny prank, “That was a good jive, you really had me fooled.”

37. Plant

To plant means to set someone up or deceive them in some way. It involves tricking someone into believing something false or taking the blame for something they didn’t do.

  • For instance, in a crime drama, a character might plant evidence to frame someone for a crime.
  • In a prank video, someone might plant a fake spider in their friend’s bed to scare them.
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he planted the stolen wallet in my bag, now everyone thinks I’m a thief.”

38. Dodge

To dodge means to avoid or evade something, often through quick movements or clever tactics. It can also refer to avoiding a question or topic in a conversation.

  • For example, in a game of dodgeball, players try to dodge the incoming balls to avoid getting hit.
  • In a political debate, a candidate might dodge a question by changing the subject.
  • A person might say, “I tried to ask him about his plans for the weekend, but he totally dodged the question.”

39. Fake out

To fake out means to deceive or trick someone by making them believe something false. It often involves creating a false impression or pretending to do something.

  • For instance, in a basketball game, a player might fake out their opponent by pretending to go one way and then quickly changing direction.
  • In a magic trick, a magician might fake out the audience by making something disappear or appear in a surprising way.
  • A person might say, “He totally faked me out with that fake lottery ticket, I thought I won a million dollars!”

40. Fleece

To fleece means to swindle or cheat someone out of their money or valuables. It involves taking advantage of someone’s trust or naivety for personal gain.

  • For example, a dishonest salesperson might fleece a customer by selling them a faulty product at an inflated price.
  • In a scam, someone might fleece unsuspecting victims by promising them a high return on their investment.
  • A person might say, “Watch out for that guy, he’s known to fleece people out of their life savings.”

41. Goldbrick

This term refers to someone who avoids work or responsibility, often by pretending to be busy or unwell. It can also be used to describe an object that appears valuable but is actually worthless.

  • For example, “He’s always goldbricking and never pulls his weight.”
  • In a discussion about a faulty product, someone might say, “Don’t fall for that goldbrick. It’s a scam.”
  • Another might comment, “That watch may look expensive, but it’s just a goldbrick.”

42. Mulct

To mulct someone means to deceive or defraud them, usually by extracting money or property through dishonest means. It is a term often used in legal or financial contexts.

  • For instance, “He was mulcted out of his life savings by an elaborate Ponzi scheme.”
  • In a conversation about scams, someone might say, “Always be cautious of people trying to mulct you out of your hard-earned money.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t be a victim of identity theft. Scammers will try to mulct you out of your personal information.”

43. Overreach

To overreach means to go beyond the proper limits or boundaries, often in an attempt to gain an advantage or deceive others. It can also refer to making unrealistic or overly ambitious claims or promises.

  • For example, “The company overreached in their advertising campaign, making promises they couldn’t deliver.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Politicians often overreach in their attempts to gain support.”
  • Another might comment, “Don’t let your ambition cause you to overreach and make mistakes.”

44. Scam artist

A scam artist, also known as a con artist, is someone who deceives others through fraudulent schemes or tricks in order to obtain money or valuables. They often use charm, persuasion, and manipulation to gain the trust of their victims.

  • For instance, “The scam artist convinced the elderly couple to give him their life savings.”
  • In a conversation about online scams, someone might say, “Beware of scam artists posing as legitimate businesses.”
  • Another might warn, “Don’t become a victim of a con artist. Always be skeptical and ask for proof before giving out personal information or money.”

45. Snake oil salesman

A snake oil salesman is a term used to describe someone who sells fraudulent or ineffective products, often claiming they have miraculous or extraordinary benefits. It can also refer to someone who makes false or exaggerated claims in order to deceive others.

  • For example, “The snake oil salesman promised a cure for all ailments with his magic elixir.”
  • In a discussion about deceptive marketing, someone might say, “Don’t fall for the tactics of snake oil salesmen.”
  • Another might comment, “It’s important to do your research and not be swayed by the false claims of a charlatan.”

46. Two-faced

This term is used to describe someone who is deceitful or dishonest, often pretending to be friendly or helpful while actually having ulterior motives.

  • For example, “I can’t trust her, she’s always been two-faced.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “Politicians are often accused of being two-faced.”
  • A person talking about a manipulative friend might say, “She’s always smiling to your face, but talking behind your back. She’s so two-faced.”

47. Underhanded

This term is used to describe actions or behavior that is sneaky, dishonest, or not done in a fair or straightforward manner.

  • For instance, “He won the game by using underhanded tactics.”
  • In a conversation about business practices, someone might say, “Some companies use underhanded methods to gain an advantage over their competitors.”
  • A person discussing a cheating partner might say, “I discovered his underhanded ways when I found out he was seeing someone else behind my back.”

48. Willy

This term is used to describe someone who is clever, cunning, or sly in their actions or behavior.

  • For example, “He’s a willy one, always finding a way to get what he wants.”
  • In a discussion about a successful con artist, someone might say, “The willy con artist managed to swindle people out of thousands of dollars.”
  • A person talking about a clever escape plan might say, “It was a willy scheme that allowed him to break out of prison.”

49. Bilk

This term is used to describe the act of cheating or defrauding someone, often by taking their money or property dishonestly.

  • For instance, “He bilked unsuspecting investors out of millions of dollars.”
  • In a conversation about a dishonest contractor, someone might say, “He bilked homeowners by taking their money and never completing the work.”
  • A person discussing a scam might say, “Be careful not to fall for any schemes that could bilk you out of your hard-earned money.”

50. Bunco

This term is used to describe a swindle or scam, often involving trickery or deception to obtain money or goods dishonestly.

  • For example, “They ran a bunco operation, tricking people into giving them money for nonexistent products.”
  • In a discussion about common scams, someone might say, “Bunco schemes often target vulnerable individuals who are easily tricked.”
  • A person talking about a fraudulent investment opportunity might say, “It turned out to be a bunco scheme, and many people lost their life savings.”

51. Chisel

To chisel means to cheat or deceive someone, often in a subtle or sneaky way.

  • For example, “He chiseled me out of my money by selling me a fake watch.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t trust him, he’s known to chisel people out of their belongings.”
  • In a card game, someone might accuse another player of chiseling by saying, “I think you’re chiseling with those marked cards.”

52. Cozen

To cozen means to trick or deceive someone by gaining their trust or confidence.

  • For instance, “She cozened her way into the company by pretending to be qualified for the job.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t let him cozen you into signing that contract without reading it.”
  • In a political context, someone might accuse a candidate of cozening voters by making false promises.

53. Diddle

To diddle means to cheat or swindle someone out of their money or possessions.

  • For example, “He diddled me out of my inheritance by forging my signature.”
  • A person might say, “Watch out for those online scams, they’re designed to diddle unsuspecting victims.”
  • In a business context, someone might accuse a competitor of diddling customers by selling inferior products.

54. Fiddle

To fiddle means to cheat or tamper with something in order to gain an advantage or deceive others.

  • For instance, “He fiddled with the scales to make it seem like he was selling more than he actually was.”
  • A person might say, “I suspect someone has been fiddling with the company’s financial records.”
  • In a sports context, someone might accuse a player of fiddling by saying, “I think he’s using performance-enhancing drugs to improve his performance.”

55. Finagle

To finagle means to deceive or manipulate someone in order to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, “He finagled his way into the VIP section by pretending to be a celebrity.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he finagled his boss into giving him a raise.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might accuse the other party of finagling by saying, “They’re trying to finagle a better deal by withholding information.”

56. Gaff

This term refers to a trick or deception, often used in the context of a practical joke or prank. It can also mean a mistake or blunder.

  • For example, someone might say, “I pulled a gaff on my friend by hiding their keys.”
  • In a discussion about magic tricks, a magician might say, “The key to a successful gaff is misdirection.”
  • A person sharing a funny story might say, “I made a gaff by accidentally wearing mismatched socks to work.”

57. Hornswoggler

This term refers to someone who deceives or swindles others. It implies a level of cunning or trickery in their actions.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Watch out for that hornswoggler, he’s always trying to sell you something you don’t need.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might warn, “Beware of online hornswogglers who promise quick riches.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was hornswoggled into buying a fake designer handbag.”
Top 57 Slang For Trick – Meaning & Usage - FluentSlang (2024)

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